People behind the Climate Educators Network – Mugisha Moses

23. January 2017

The Climate Educator Network CEN supports and facilitates capacity building and exchange between educators like teachers, group leaders or trainers around the world in the fields of sustainable development and climate protection. Today there are more than 50 educators from about 20 different countries part of the CEN community, one of them is Mugisha Moses. Mugisha, a long-term myclimate fellow and local myclimate expert, lives in Kampala, Uganda. He gives some insides in his work and his motivation in being part of CEN.

climate education; education in Uganda; Mugisha Moses

Mugisha Moses, doing a school visit in Kawempe

Mugisha, when did you get in touch with myclimate and why did you consider working with myclimate as good fit for you?

I got in touch with myclimate in 2008. Myclimate’s pioneering role in global climate protection inspired me a lot. Though the consequences of climate change were already clear in Uganda, there was less awareness. Thus, we teamed up and started collaborating on climate education projects.

Please describe briefly the work you are doing?

I coordinate and carry out climate education projects in local secondary schools in Uganda with the intention of sharing knowledge and experiences towards climate resilience (both locally and internationally) through mitigation and adaptation mechanisms.

Besides climate education, I am a lawyer. I help rural farmers and climate change driven social enterprises in Uganda access free transactional legal support.

Why is knowledge about climate change and sustainability an important issue in Uganda?

Uganda is the second youngest country in the world in terms of demographics. The majority of the population is below 30 years of age. At the same time, there is high unemployment rate. This combined with climate change is not good news at all.

However, there is some advantage to this. Young people can easily adopt and adapt to new changes and they are dynamic enough to find solutions. Therefore, knowledge about climate change and sustainability is very important if Uganda’s young population is to understand the real problem they are dealing with and the possible angles to tackle it.

What kind of skills and expertise do you bring in to the CEN community and what kind of exchange are you looking for?

I have over seven years of experience in climate change education and sustainability. I can design, implement and evaluate education projects. To be able to teach, one must have the ability to learn, unlearn and relearn. Therefore, the exchanges I am looking for are not limited in scope, I am open to share and learn all ideas- sustainability.

What is your main motivation, what drives every morning to work for sustainability?

There is a common phrase that “the best things in life are free”. Look at the air we breathe for example, no one pays for it. The moment it is contaminated, normally by human activities, the price becomes unpayable. We as humans should be grateful for the free things provided to us by nature which we could never afford by any means possible if we were to pay for them. This drives me to work in sustainability.

Climate Educators Network, the most recent myclimate educational programme, offers an online platform. Participants create their profile in a few steps. With their finished profile they get the access to the profiles of the existing community members. Like in other social networks CEN community members can start to connect, network and looking for ideas, know-how, inspiration and support for own interactive educational activities.

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