Cooking with Corn Cobs Instead of Coal

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    "We can use the money saved for the education of our children, to buy new clothes, improve our lives and visit the doctor." Liu Zhihong, User of Biomass Stove

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    This grandmother paid 300 Yuan (USD 50) for her stove, myclimate subsidizes a stove with the same amount. The average income of the underclass is around USD 300.

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    The new efficient stoves can be lit with corn cobs which are traditionally being cultivated in the area.

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    Everybody helps in the harvesting season.

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    Corn cob piles which are dehydrated that way.

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    One of the most visible signs of the urban-rural disparity in China is the difference in the household energy sector. While cleaner-burning petroleum-based fuels are increasingly common in wealthier areas, at least 50 percent of all households still depend on solid fuels like wood or coal as an important household fuel.

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    Traditional stove which is lit with stone coal.

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    Depot of corn cobs for cooking and heating.

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    Typical scenario: coal depot of a family. People still use coal for heating in wintertime as coal burns longer therefore they do not have to get up at night.

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    Workers are provided with a steady workflow, and a steady income, as a result of the business development introduced by the project proponents.

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    Both Jinqilin CKQI and CKQ model stoves can use unprocessed crop residues and processed “briquette” crop residues, which are continually loaded with a manual fuel-feed. The stoves increase combustion efficiency by using primary airflow that flows up through the grate at the bottom of the stove, and secondary airflow that enters the combustion chamber through holes added on the upper part of the stove.

This project replaces coal consumption from traditional coal burning stoves with improved clean biomass burning semi-gasifier stoves in rural households within Shanxi Province, Hubei Province and Guizhou Province in China. CO2 emissions can be avoided by reducing coal consumption. The cleaner stoves improve indoor air quality which benefits the health of the women and children.

1,000-1,500 USD saved on fuel
1,000-1,500
USD saved on fuel
140,000 stoves installed
140,000
stoves installed
1.2 mio tonnes of charcoal avoided
1.2 mio
tonnes of charcoal avoided

One of the most visible signs of the urban-rural disparity in China is in the household energy sector. While cleaner-burning petroleum-based fuels are increasingly common in wealthier areas, at least 50 percent of all households still depend on solid fuels like wood or coal as an important household fuel. A practice resulting in pollution exposures that the World Health Organization estimates to be annually responsible for over 420,000 premature deaths in China alone. 

What I like most about the stove, besides the convenience, is that since buying the stove I’ve saved so much money from not having to buy coal for cooking. It is wonderful, every home in our Shanxi should have one.
Li Xiaoxia, owner of a Jinqilin stove since 2009

myclimate, Impact Carbon and the China Association of Rural Energy Industry (CAREI) have partnered to alleviate the health and climate burdens found in rural China due to the inefficient and dirty use of solid fuels such as wood and coal for household energy demands. This partnership promotes the use of efficient and clean household energy technologies that can be used for cooking, heating, and water purification throughout China.

The coal used to cost us 1500 Yuan per year. Now with the biomass stove we save a lot of money and it’s more convenient. In spring we plant the seeds. The corn is then sold on the market for money and the leftovers can be used for cooking with the biomass stove.
Nie Bianyu, User of biomass stove, China

Carbon finance revenues will be reinvested into the project to directly subsidize stove purchases for rural customers that cannot afford the stoves. Carbon revenues will also be applied in social marketing campaigns, quality control measures, solidifying supply chains, and a host of other activities.

IMPACTS AND BENEFITS ACHIEVED:

  • 140,000 stoves have been installed in three provinces.
  • 278 jobs have been created.
  • More than 1.2 million tons of charcoal have been avoided since the start of the project.
  • Households save USD 1,000-1,500 on fuel over the stove’s five year lifetime.
  • Each stove avoids about 4.5 t CO2 per year.
  • Households save EUR 80 for every Euro spent on the stove.
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